Begin A New Adventure

Wish to share / learn new things about Italy with a fantastic group of people?

  1. Tutto Italy uses cookies and by continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. This notice is in regards to the EU Cookie Law. Learn More.

Is Ice Popular Over In Italy?

Discussion in 'Italian Food and Drink' started by sallymarie, Aug 5, 2015.

  1. I like to use ice in about all my cold beverages here in the states. When I was over in Germany (years ago), I had a hard time finding it. Matter of fact, I had a bit of a stay in one of the hospitals over there. After surgery, I wanted some ice chips and none were to be found.

    So, I am curious. Is ice popular over in Italy?
     
  2. Never seen ice chips in Italy.
     
  3. Actually now that you mention it, I can't recall seeing it either!

    It's one of those things I guess I had never thought about until you brought my attention to it - and now I really don't think I ever had ice in a drink in Italy. It's making me want to go back through my pictures and check! :eek:
     
    sallymarie likes this.
  4. I've never had ice in a drink before in Italy, which is surprising now looking back on it. It seems like such a small thing which is done everywhere, but it's true - it's far rare in Italy.
     
    sallymarie likes this.
  5. Responses thus far, confirm ice cubes in beverages not as popular, as it is here in the U.S. I suppose I just think I need it in all my drinks. Now that I wonder about it, kind of strange for me to use ice when out and about and then drink my bottled water.
     
    notyourcommodity likes this.
  6. Most drinks are always refrigerated in Italy, so you often get a bottle or can with a straw from what I remember. As I drink white wine, it's always chilled. The US is very ice orientated to the point where it can be 3/4 full, I see that as a ploy to give less product though.

    In the UK it's not as bad, because you get asked if you want ice or not generally. Personally I never have ice because it causes a acid reflux for me, and it also dilutes the drink and ruins the flavor. Why ruin a good apple juice and dilute it?
     
  7. Yes, in the UK you get offered ice with almost every drink. But I rarely have it for the same reason as you - unless you drink it very quickly and leave the ice at the end, it just makes the drink taste really strange.
     
  8. While ice is popular in the UK, ecerytime I've been to another European country, I dint recall it being offered. That includes, Italy, Germany, France, Spain or Portugal.

    As others have said, in these countries all the drinks are served chilled anyway so I guess there's no need for it to be an option, on the other hand though, I'm sure it would be available if you requested it.
     
  9. Yes, ice can certainly save on costs, if you fill the cup half full with it. In my younger days, working in the food and drink industry we told to always fill the glass half full or even up to three quarters full. So while I do like my ice I only add a little bit to get the most bang for my buck.

    Interesting you equate acid reflux with ice. I did not know there was a connection between the two. I am cautious of the water I drink, so I purchase bottled water, yet I will use ice in a store, restaurant, or hotel when I have not idea if the ice machines are even clean.

    Anyways, I have never heard anyone every ask me if I want ice or not. Here in the states, it is assumed we want ice in our water and sodas. Not so much in our juices and never in milk.
     
  10. Yes, you can get acid reflux from an excess of ice, especially if you have soda or fruit juices. The best water to drink is room temperature.

    I have noticed whenever I order a drink from a bar they scoop the whole glass with ice and I have to tell them to get rid of it. I now always order without ice and if I need a cube or two afterwards then it's easier to control. I guess for drinks on draft ice saves places money, as they are filling up half a glass. The US has an ice culture with ice machines in hotels and in restaurants, but in Europe these are not normal at all. Besides it costs too much to maintain to store and dispense.
     
    sallymarie likes this.

Share This Page