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General health....

Discussion in 'General Discussion About Italy' started by DianaR, May 24, 2009.

  1. General health....

    I am always curious to hear how other countries approach public health issues.

    In the USA we are constantly bombarded with anti-smoking, complaints that citizens are grossly overweight and other issues meant to keep us from considering the quality of life issues that might cut into corporate profits if addressed and resolved.

    What sorts of health/behavior messages does the average Italian hear on a daily basis?
     
  2. Only just recently have i started to see advertisements on tv to try and help people give up smoking.

    Smoking is banned in enclosed areas such as pubs, bars, clubs, train stations, airports etc... (unless the location provides a smoking area and has all the correct extractor fans in place)
     
  3. we do have lots of advertisements to limit the use of cigarettes and intake of alcohol but the people just don't listen. i even saw some kids aged less than 13 hiding behind a school and smoking.
     
  4. Do you think government should really ban smoking? I mean... Its the people's choice whether to smoke or not right?
     
  5. well i hope that it will be implemented and the citizens will abide on this..or is it already approved and implemented?
     
  6. I honestly think public health advertising is becoming an International thing. If it's not smoking it's fast food and obesity, alcohol and drugs.
     
  7. I think there aren't enough campaigns in the world to stop people from ruining their health.
    Recently, there are more and more campaigns that try to convince people to stop smoking but let's get serious, if you are a smoker it's unlikely that a poster will change your mind!!

    Instead, I have seen this really awesome TV commercial for an electronic cigarette.
    The commercial showed a couple at a restaurant, having dinner and the guy was smoking an electronic cigarette.
    Then, at the end of the commercial... well, just look at it yourself :p

     
  8. Personally I don't see so many campaigns in Italy about Health, smoking or junk food.
    Bu at least there is the "new" law about not smoking in public area.

    I remember that going in pubs 10 years ago (or something more) was always like entering in a foggy cave
     
  9. @Luca, what do "public areas" include exactly?
    I know that smoking is prohibited in bars and closed places that serve food & drinks in general, but is that all?

    I used to be a smoker but quit a while back. I think it's been 2 years since I lighted a cigarette.
    However, even as a smoker and even if I had just lighted a cigarette on the street, if I saw a child near me I would immediately put it off. I thought about doing the same when old people were around but they're too many :D

    I think that smokers should respect the fresh air of others, especially when there are children around. I actually get very mad when someone walks in front of me, smoking, and blows the smoke right on me while walking behind them.

    So, is it possible that public places will soon include parks as well? I don't have anything against smokers, I was one myself, but I really would love to enjoy a nice walk in the park without smelling someone else's smoke.
     
  10. I'm not a smoker so I've never studied too well this, but for what I know a "public area", in Italy, it's usually a closed environment, while, in general, you can smoke everywhere in open spaces.

    Some exceptions are open spaces near schools or hospitals
     
  11. I was at Bologna centrale train station last week and noticed that they have introduced smoking areas which are usually found on the platforms.

    I'm sure that they prefer that smokers only smoke in these areas and being Italy, rules are made to be broken so I'm not sure if they would actually fine you if caught smoking outside of the smoking zones.

    Still, a good start in making smoking more anti-social which in the long term will hopefully stop the younger generation from starting.
     
  12. Let's hope so!

    I made some calculations after I stopped smoking and realized that I used to spend about 200 euros a month to smoke (I never liked the cheap cigarettes and went with the more expensive ones). I came to realize how I threw about 2,500 Euros out the window every year to get cancer!

    That's when I realized that I will never smoke again. Sometimes the health factor isn't enough to make people see how bad smoking is because when you're young you think you have everything and your health is still intact. But when you realize you could have bought a car with that money, maybe you'll think twice before starting :D
     
  13. Good point Rosie, I think that like you when the price of cigarettes went up a lot of smokers decided to have a more healthy life
     
  14. I remember the last time I visited my home city (london) in March of this year the price of a packet of 20 was touching £9 - Thats about €12 a packet.

    In Italy, even the more popular brands are around €5 for a pack of 20.

    I agree with Rosie about the health factor, people will only quit / reduce smoking when it really hits them hard. I believe the only way people will quit is to push the prices up further!

    BTW, I am a smoker. I gave up for more than a year but have just recently started again.

    The more I have to pay, the higher the chances of me giving up this habit!
     
  15. I understand that people have free will and if they choose to abuse their own health, then only a totalitarian society would forbid them to do it.

    Where they abuse others, however, by passive smoking or smoking in a children's play park (which I saw in my home country recently) for example, then I think the law has to act to protect the innocent.
     
    Chillout, Rosie and Luca like this.
  16. Good points Truscano
     
  17. @Truscano, you said it!
    It's exactly what I meant with my reply above but you said it better: abuse is what it's called when someone forces me to smell their smoke.

    @Chillout: I know the feeling of starting to smoke again, when I was a bit younger I used to quit every month or so :D But it never lasted. I still remember how my school mates have ripped into pieces all of my cigarettes after making me promise I'll quit one New Year's Eve. They let me smoke "my last one" while they destroyed the rest of the pack.
    Of course.... it only took a few weeks until I started again.

    Quitting is EXTREMELY HARD, but not impossible.
     
  18. @Rosie I will be quitting again very soon.

    @Truscano I agree with this too and some countries are already taking tougher measures to cut smoking in many public places and increasing the prices. I absolutely agree there where there are children, smoking should be banned.

    My only concerns is that although they introduce new laws, the governments earn a lot of revenue from tobacco products and unfortunately that is more important to them than people's health.

    Smoking aids to help people give up smoking are very expensive in Italy. For example, I once used the patches and they cost €28 per pack (7 days) in Italy.

    In the UK the same brand and pack costs around €10.

    If they really want to help people quit, then they can at least reduce the prices of these products as its clear that they are well over priced.
     
    Rosie likes this.
  19. I recently returned from Venice. I found it to be very laid back and relaxed regarding health and safety. On smoking packets, they did have cancer warnings etc, but other than that, I didn't notice a great deal of health warnings. Interesting. Seems to be fairly normal though for mainland Europe.
     
  20. I think only in recent years Italians have been bombarded with anti-smoking signs. Likewise is true for drunk driving signs.

    Overall, I think the Italian diet is a lot healthier then here in the US. They have a lot more natural products compared to the pre-packaged food items we consume here in the US. Also, especially in the southern region a lot of Italians grow their own food products. Farming is much more popular in Italy then it is here in the US.
     

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