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Becoming A Dual Citizen

Discussion in 'General Discussion About Italy' started by sallymarie, Mar 31, 2015.

  1. I was wondering, if any members here have applied for dual citizenship? I looked into the matter briefly, a few years back, but now I am thinking about really following through. Well, actually, it would be for my husband and children. I know they qualify because my husband's dad was born before his dad became a citizenship of the United States. Well, I am not even sure, if he ever became a citizen. I know the town where my husband's father immigrated from and think I will need to get in contact to retrieve his birth certificate. I am aware it would not be an overnight process, and can probably figure out all the steps, but it would be really helpful, if someone else has completed these steps. Any input, appreciated.
     
  2. I know that e.g. a lot of football players from Serbia has the dual citizenship (Serbia and Italy) but when looking to Austria there is the dual citizenship as I know not possible. So it depends finally also from which country you are originally.
     
  3. My brother and sister just did this - so they have Australian and Italian citizenship. The entire process took a few years, actually, from getting appointments with the Italian consulate, to getting documents confirmed and so forth. My grandparents were both born in Italy and then migrated to Australia so my siblings were able to claim Italian citizenship through that route.

    As for me, I'm married to an American citizen and so that's why I haven't pursued the Italian Citizenship side of things.
     
  4. Once you have the birth certificates then you will have a better idea of whether you can or not. They are clamping down on ancestral passports more, but it depends where your children's grandfather was born rather then when he became a citizen. I don't know what country you are in either, but you need to pay for someone to translate all the documents who is certified as a translator.

    Bear in mind rules keep changing, so if you want to do it, you should start as soon as you have the information.
     
    sallymarie likes this.
  5. #5 sallymarie, Aug 11, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2015
    Right, sure does depend on country. I would presume that since you are from Austria and part of the European Union, becoming a dual citizen of Italy is not on your list of things to do. ;) It is still on my list, now that this thread popped back up, it is time to get the ball rolling. Thanks for the motivation by commenting!


    Oh, interesting scenario, of course makes since that your grandparents were born in Italy. I am not surprise by the lengthy process. Still worth all the time and effort to get dual citizenship. Do you think you will ever go through the process yourself to be both an American and Italian citizen? Hmm do you already have a dual citizen as an Australian and American? That would be pretty cool.

    Hey Gabe, missed you comment, so trying to edit to add your quote. Thanks for the heads up. Valuable information you've provided, sure hope that the rules will allow my children to get their dual citizenship, well I will start with my husband. I know the name of the village in Sicily because I have seen the paperwork on their arrival dates. Since my kids are visiting in the county in the USA where their death certificates are located, think I will have them pick up copies. Got to work on getting those birth certificates and having it all translated and certified, pronto!


    "Once you have the birth certificates then you will have a better idea of whether you can or not. They are clamping down on ancestral passports more, but it depends where your children's grandfather was born rather then when he became a citizen. I don't know what country you are in either, but you need to pay for someone to translate all the documents who is certified as a translator.

    Bear in mind rules keep changing, so if you want to do it, you should start as soon as you have the information"
     
  6. Right now I'm an Australian citizen with US permanent residency status but I think eventually I would like to become a U.S. Citizen - I wish that I could have all three (Australian, US and Italian) but they cap you at two I believe!

    The reason I would choose dual Australian/US over Australian/Italian is because our daughter is a U.S. citizen by birth since she was born in the USA -- so just for logistical purposes it's easier if I'm also a citizen there! But I need to work on getting her Australian citizenship papers organized.

    Phew!
     
  7. I don't know that much about these type of things but would you like to have the italian citizenship? For work and live here?
     
  8. My siblings got theirs so that it would be simple for travel in Europe, and also for the possibility of perhaps working in Italy some time in the future. I don't think they would ever live there permanently, but they felt the ancestral connection to Italy and wanted that to be a part of their lives.
     
  9. While I also have limited knowledge when it comes to this sort of thing, I was reading an article a few days ago, and it reminded me of this thread on here. When I find it again, I'll post the link to it, but until I do, it was basically saying that dual citizenship is becoming harder and harder to attain these days, due to the problems with immigration. The simple background checks that used to be in place are being completely reworked and looked at, just to try and make sure people aren't seeking it to gain entry to the EU by the backdoor or on a technicality.
     
  10. Each EU country has it's own rules and some limit it to grandparents now, because records are easier to locate and to verify. That's why people should still get a passport if they can, so the next generation will have more options. Some people don't think about it because they don't need it.

    My friend has an Irish great-great grandfather, so her father can get a passport but not her. Now if her grandfather had registered and got one (they still are trying to find out if he did) then she would be eligible. It's not so much clamping down, but who is entitled to it. They can still reject any application if someone has a criminal background despite all the paperwork being in order.
     

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